14 Oct

What Agreement Ended The American Revolution

The Treaty of Paris, signed on September 3, 1783 in Paris by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of America, officially ended the American War of Independence. The treaty set the boundaries between the British Empire in North America and the United States of America, on “extremely generous” lines with the latter. [2] Details included fishing rights and the restoration of property and prisoners of war. The Treaty of Paris was signed on September 3, 1783 by American and British representatives and ended the American Revolutionary War. Based on a provisional treaty of 1782, the agreement recognized the independence of the United States and granted the United States significant Western territory. The 1783 treaty was part of a series of treaties signed in Paris in 1783 that also established peace between Britain and the allied nations of France, Spain and the Netherlands. The Treaty of Paris of 1783 officially ended the American War of Independence. American statesmen Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and John Jay negotiated the peace treaty with representatives of King George III of Great Britain. In the Treaty of Paris, the British Crown officially recognized American independence and ceded most of its territory east of the Mississippi River to the United States, doubling the size of the new nation and paving the way for westward expansion. The U.S. victory at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781 resulted in peace talks in which British negotiators were willing to consider U.S.

independence as a possibility. British parliamentary governments of the eighteenth century tended to be unstable, dependent on both a majority in the House of Commons and the good favor of the king. When news of Yorktown arrived in London, the parliamentary opposition succeeded in overthrowing the besieged government of Frederick North, Lord North. In 1795, John Jay returned to Europe to solve these problems with Britain.